Danny Krivit

VINTAGE FESTIVAL NIGHT: CRISPY with DANNY KRIVIT

VENERDÌ 11 SETTEMBRE 2015

Vintage Festival Italia 2015 arricchisce la propria nightlife con un’inedita collaborazione con il Crispy, il party che ha rivitalizzato i clubbers della “Saint City”, con un’esclusiva one night che ospiterà un special guest di fama internazionale: Danny Krivit, leggendario dj newyorkese e forza propulsiva della club culture della Grande Mela fin dalla fine degli anni ’70.

Un bambino abituato a far fronte a personaggi come Jimi Hendrix, Janis JoplinJohn Lennon; un ragazzo che chiacchierava con James Brown, che pattinava e suonava al fianco di Dave Mancuso e Larry Levan in templi della Disco come il The Loft e il Paradise Garage; un uomo che ha creato una delle feste più importanti e durature della storia di New York City. Figlio di una cantante jazz e del manager di Chet Baker,  comincia a farsi le ossa come resident dj nel locale gestito del padre, lo “Ones”, riuscendo a conquistarsi in poco tempo le simpatie di colonne della scena underground come Nicky Siano e David Mancuso. É proprio nel mitico Loft di Mancuso che nasce l’amicizia con Larry Levan e François Kevorkian.

Dopo aver consolidato la sua fama come dj in tutto il mondo, grazie ai suoi successi nei migliori club della East Coast e anche grazie al suo lavoro in studio con artisti del calibro di James Brown e Gloria Gaynor, fonda nel 1996 la one night domenicale chiamata “Body and Soul” insieme a Joe Claussell e François Kevorkian. I tre porteranno “Body and Soul” in tutto il globo, riuscendo nel 1999 a riunire 15.000 appassionati dell’House Music nel cuore di Central Park. Dopo 40 anni di carriera e più di 50.000 vinili nella sua collezione, il talento e la passione di Krivit rimangono indiscutibili.

VINTAGE-FESTIVAL-NIGHT-CRISPY-DANNY-KRIVIT-DAX-DJ-poster

Ad aprire le danze Dj Dax, resident del Crispy e impeccabile selezionatore di musica elettronica. Avido collezionista di vinili, eclettico e travolgente.

www.vintagefestival.org/2015/portfolio-posts/danny-krivit/
http://crispypd.tumblr.com
FunkyTown70

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Evento ufficiale Vintage Fuori Festival 2015
Venerdì 11 Settembre 2015 dalle 23:00 alle 04:00

INGRESSO INTERO: €18 (drink incluso)

Ingresso ridotto in lista:
€15 (drink incluso)
Invia un SMS con il tuo nome e cognome al +39 349 3157135 o una email a crispy.pd@hotmail.it


Location:
Q LOUNGE BAR
VICOLO DEI DOTTO, 3
35139 PADOVA

DANNY KRIVIT

EDITS BY MR. K STRUT
The Original Rare Disco Mixes Edits by Mr. K (Year2003)

1. Diana Ross – No One Gets The Prize (Re-edited Jimmy Simpson remix)
2. Caress – Catch The Rhythm
3. Cymande – Bra
4. Betty Wright – Where Is The Love
5. LTD – Love To The World
6. Ecstasy Passion and Pain – Ask Me (Re-worked)
7. Lenny Williams – You Got Me Runnin’ (Breakdown Edit)
8. Sly & The Family Stone – Dance To The Music (Medley)
9. The Sisters Love – Give Me Your Love
10a. Genie Brown – I Can’t Stop Talking
10b. Tribe – Koke

This unrivalled collection, paired with years of experience behind the decks of New York clubs as varied as The Roxy, playing hip hop alongside D.ST, Red Alert, and Bambaataa, or guesting at the Paradise Garage alongside Larry Levan, rightfully places Danny up there as one of the world’s elite, truly able to play out that DJ cliché of ‘taking people on a journey’ with epic sets spanning up to seventeen hours.
The latest generation of successful DJs and producers are a significantly different breed. Today’s DJ will play short two hour sets from a box of the latest big tunes and producers will make tracks that might never leave the confines of their computer’s hard drive. It’s a world away from the analogue beginnings of dance music.
“You’re taking a puzzle. Parts that someone else did and you’re re-arranging those parts, you’re using some parts and not using others.” Executed well, the resulting “remix” produced a song that would keep people dancing harder and for longer than the original version.

With this album, ‘Edits by Mr. K’, Strut presents ten of the best edits from Danny’s archive, spanning 1983 to the present day. All are gems of their time and reflect his expertise both in the studio and his experience of what works on the dancefloor. But, despite the acclaim his work has received over the years, the early transition from successful DJ to successful ”remixer” was far from easy.

DJ Booth to studio
“My first remix was for Sleeping Bag Records. It was very disappointing. The session was more than 50% wasted time with the engineer saying, ‘We can fix that in editing’ but it was soon clear that he couldn’t edit. At this point I couldn’t edit either but I did know what a bad edit was! Soon after that I did a remix for another small label and déjà vu! The same thing happened again & most of the session was wasted. By now I had learnt how to edit, but only in theory. I knew I couldn’t do any worse than this guy but I just didn’t have the nerve to jump in & fix it.
“I’d heard a lot of other edits by DJs like Francois Kevorkian and Walter Gibbons but I didn’t think I was in the same league. These two frustrating mixes were the push I needed to start playing around and try ideas.
“I had a reel to reel as, back then, it was fairly standard equipment. If you wanted to record, there were no DAT tapes or CDs. It was cassette or reel to reel. Even back then cassettes were a little dodgy – you couldn’t call cassettes a master. But a reel to reel was a master of something, whether it was music that wasn’t released or a mix that you had done. People would also use the reel to reel as an effects box. We didn’t have these little silver Pioneer effects boxes, so you’d use the reel to reel as an echo chamber. That was very common.”

Editing Influences
“In a disco you can make very abrupt changes and somehow feel you’ve segued people into that, or feel they can move with that change. What I learnt from DJ-ing at the roller rink is how important the groove is. I like to keep to a groove, not to be monotonous, but to take you on a trip. Beat on beat mixing without paying attention to the groove can really break people’s mood.

The artists on editing
“I have spoken with a couple of artists and it’s a mixed bag. When it comes to classic records, they’re usually already in a situation where they’re not seeing any royalties. Sometimes they even appreciate the fact that somebody liked it enough to give it a second life. I generally work with a lot of artists that have been forgotten so it’s not like I’m re-working Sade or Prince. I’m doing stuff that’s quite obscure and forgotten about and companies don’t give it the time of day, even in their reissue series. When I spoke to Vince Montana, he was just flattered that I might be doing something like that, but at the same time he was saying, ‘Well, if it’s worth doing, how come I don’t do that?’ At least he was in a situation to be able to do it – many people aren’t that lucky.
“The other side of it is that I’m not bastardising these things, I’m not tearing them apart with a different track and saying that the original was OK but this is completely different, & better! I’m only working on songs that I liked from the start. I’m not messing with the vocals or getting rid of things. I try to complement it by only altering it slightly, really just extending it.”

Legitimate releases
“Since the ’80s, a bunch of these versions have become legitimate. I remember in particular when I would give Francois one of these edits he would say, “Oh this is really bad, you shouldn’t do this.” And I would say, “I only edited it. If you don’t want it, don’t take it.” But I was soon getting legitimate work from them. In ’86 I was given several projects from PolyGram, I worked on ‘Touch & Go’ (Ecstacy, Passion & Pain) from Sunnyview, Nuphonic put out ‘Love Is The Message’ and Salsoul (Unidisc) put out ‘Salsoul Rainbow’ and ‘Runaway’ (Salsoul Orchestra). Most recently, Ibadan released my versions of ‘Rock Steady’ (Aretha Franklin) and ‘Sultana’ (Titanic) and Strut’s ‘Grass Roots’ compilation and 12”s featured several edits and gave out a clear picture of my personal taste & what I’m about.”

Reel to Reel vs Computers
“Lots of times I would make a mistake, putting the wrong piece in backwards or in the wrong place and it turns into an idea. A good example was with ‘Let’s Start The Dance’ in ‘Rock The House’ with a couple of mistake edits in it that sound really interesting. I thought, ‘Hey that works’, so you run in to interesting things with tape that you might not with a computer.
“I started using computers about two years ago. I completely appreciate computers. The sound quality of a reel to reel is excellent but once you start handling a tape more than a couple of times you start to hear a quality loss. Reel to reels are also very touchy and hard to maintain. I feel the computer is very dependable and there’s so much more manipulation available with the effects. At this level it’s still not remixing, but you can add a little post-production.

Simon Haggis, December 2002.

THNX to Simon Haggis, Toni Rossano www.strut.co.uk STRUT
The Original Rare Disco Mixes Edits by Mr. K

1. Diana Ross – No One Gets The Prize (Re-edited Jimmy Simpson remix)
2. Caress – Catch The Rhythm
3. Cymande – Bra
4. Betty Wright – Where Is The Love
5. LTD – Love To The World
6. Ecstasy Passion and Pain – Ask Me (Re-worked)
7. Lenny Williams – You Got Me Runnin’ (Breakdown Edit)
8. Sly & The Family Stone – Dance To The Music (Medley)
9. The Sisters Love – Give Me Your Love
10a. Genie Brown – I Can’t Stop Talking
10b. Tribe – Koke

This unrivalled collection, paired with years of experience behind the decks of New York clubs as varied as The Roxy, playing hip hop alongside D.ST, Red Alert, and Bambaataa, or guesting at the Paradise Garage alongside Larry Levan, rightfully places Danny up there as one of the world’s elite, truly able to play out that DJ cliché of ‘taking people on a journey’ with epic sets spanning up to seventeen hours.
The latest generation of successful DJs and producers are a significantly different breed. Today’s DJ will play short two hour sets from a box of the latest big tunes and producers will make tracks that might never leave the confines of their computer’s hard drive. It’s a world away from the analogue beginnings of dance music.
“You’re taking a puzzle. Parts that someone else did and you’re re-arranging those parts, you’re using some parts and not using others.” Executed well, the resulting “remix” produced a song that would keep people dancing harder and for longer than the original version.

With this album, ‘Edits by Mr. K’, Strut presents ten of the best edits from Danny’s archive, spanning 1983 to the present day. All are gems of their time and reflect his expertise both in the studio and his experience of what works on the dancefloor. But, despite the acclaim his work has received over the years, the early transition from successful DJ to successful ”remixer” was far from easy.

DJ Booth to studio
“My first remix was for Sleeping Bag Records. It was very disappointing. The session was more than 50% wasted time with the engineer saying, ‘We can fix that in editing’ but it was soon clear that he couldn’t edit. At this point I couldn’t edit either but I did know what a bad edit was! Soon after that I did a remix for another small label and déjà vu! The same thing happened again & most of the session was wasted. By now I had learnt how to edit, but only in theory. I knew I couldn’t do any worse than this guy but I just didn’t have the nerve to jump in & fix it.
“I’d heard a lot of other edits by DJs like Francois Kevorkian and Walter Gibbons but I didn’t think I was in the same league. These two frustrating mixes were the push I needed to start playing around and try ideas.
“I had a reel to reel as, back then, it was fairly standard equipment. If you wanted to record, there were no DAT tapes or CDs. It was cassette or reel to reel. Even back then cassettes were a little dodgy – you couldn’t call cassettes a master. But a reel to reel was a master of something, whether it was music that wasn’t released or a mix that you had done. People would also use the reel to reel as an effects box. We didn’t have these little silver Pioneer effects boxes, so you’d use the reel to reel as an echo chamber. That was very common.”

Editing Influences
“In a disco you can make very abrupt changes and somehow feel you’ve segued people into that, or feel they can move with that change. What I learnt from DJ-ing at the roller rink is how important the groove is. I like to keep to a groove, not to be monotonous, but to take you on a trip. Beat on beat mixing without paying attention to the groove can really break people’s mood.

The artists on editing
“I have spoken with a couple of artists and it’s a mixed bag. When it comes to classic records, they’re usually already in a situation where they’re not seeing any royalties. Sometimes they even appreciate the fact that somebody liked it enough to give it a second life. I generally work with a lot of artists that have been forgotten so it’s not like I’m re-working Sade or Prince. I’m doing stuff that’s quite obscure and forgotten about and companies don’t give it the time of day, even in their reissue series. When I spoke to Vince Montana, he was just flattered that I might be doing something like that, but at the same time he was saying, ‘Well, if it’s worth doing, how come I don’t do that?’ At least he was in a situation to be able to do it – many people aren’t that lucky.
“The other side of it is that I’m not bastardising these things, I’m not tearing them apart with a different track and saying that the original was OK but this is completely different, & better! I’m only working on songs that I liked from the start. I’m not messing with the vocals or getting rid of things. I try to complement it by only altering it slightly, really just extending it.”

Legitimate releases
“Since the ’80s, a bunch of these versions have become legitimate. I remember in particular when I would give Francois one of these edits he would say, “Oh this is really bad, you shouldn’t do this.” And I would say, “I only edited it. If you don’t want it, don’t take it.” But I was soon getting legitimate work from them. In ’86 I was given several projects from PolyGram, I worked on ‘Touch & Go’ (Ecstacy, Passion & Pain) from Sunnyview, Nuphonic put out ‘Love Is The Message’ and Salsoul (Unidisc) put out ‘Salsoul Rainbow’ and ‘Runaway’ (Salsoul Orchestra). Most recently, Ibadan released my versions of ‘Rock Steady’ (Aretha Franklin) and ‘Sultana’ (Titanic) and Strut’s ‘Grass Roots’ compilation and 12”s featured several edits and gave out a clear picture of my personal taste & what I’m about.”

Reel to Reel vs Computers
“Lots of times I would make a mistake, putting the wrong piece in backwards or in the wrong place and it turns into an idea. A good example was with ‘Let’s Start The Dance’ in ‘Rock The House’ with a couple of mistake edits in it that sound really interesting. I thought, ‘Hey that works’, so you run in to interesting things with tape that you might not with a computer.
“I started using computers about two years ago. I completely appreciate computers. The sound quality of a reel to reel is excellent but once you start handling a tape more than a couple of times you start to hear a quality loss. Reel to reels are also very touchy and hard to maintain. I feel the computer is very dependable and there’s so much more manipulation available with the effects. At this level it’s still not remixing, but you can add a little post-production.

Simon Haggis, December 2002.

THNX to Simon Haggis, Toni Rossano www.strut.co.uk

MAESTRO

4 years in the making for the first time in a motion picture 
The Movement that became dance music of today. 

starring:
Larry Levan, David Mancuso, Frankie Knuckles, Nicky Siano, Francis Grasso, Francois K., “Little Louie” Vega, Danny Tenaglia, Jellybean, Tony Humphries, Danny Krivit, Joaquin “Joe” Claussell, Richard Long, Alex Rosner, Keith Haring, Derrick May, Kenny Carpenter, Jose Padilla (Spain), Sven Vath (Germany), Mr. Mike (Switzerland), Dimitri From Paris (France), Boyd Jarvis, Fantastic Plastic Machine (Japan), Mark Oliver (Toronto), Frankie Bones, Danny Rampling (UK), Albert Assoon (Toronto), Alex Neri (Italy), Pete Tong (UK), Gregory Gray (Chicago), Bobby (UK), Fabrice (Italy), Ralf (Italy), Ron Carroll (Chicago), Craig Loftis, Benji Espinoza (DJ International, Chicago), Nori (Japan), Tony Desypris (Montreal), Ivan Iacobucci (Italy), Yukihiro Fukutomi (Japan), Billie (Artist), Robert Ouimet (Montreal), Steve D’aquisto Alan Thompson (UK), Antonio Ocasio, Patricia Field, Mike Stone, Ricky L & Sauro (Italy), Cosmo, Original Loft And Garage Dancers, Rene Hewitt, Smokin Jo, Robert Clivilles (C&C Music Factory)

SYNOPSIS
Maestro, a feature documentary, tells the story of how a group of people found refuge and a call for life outside the mainstream, what evolved was a scene that set the ground work for what was to come in dance music culture worldwide.
A film 4 years in the making, a rare insight into the underground world as it was.
It’s the first time this story is told in a motion Picture, included in the film are pioneer dance music DJs and producers, ”founding fathers”, its center being Larry Levan, as well as high-profile DJs of today.
It vividly portrays the world that spawned today’s dance music from 2-step, to the eclectic sounds of tribal, to pop artists. Parties from Ibiza to Philly, all are influenced by the quintessential elements that made New York City’s Paradise Garage and The Loft such a powerful cultural force in people’s lives.
DJs Larry Levan (Paradise Garage) and David Mancuso (The Loft) continue to be revered today as the leaders of dance music culture worldwide.
This seminal movement—encompassing dancers, patrons, artists, DJs, sound designers, and more—gave birth to DJ pioneers in the film and contemporary dance club parties across the globe.
Most film documents of this historical movement have fallen short of its true story and impact to the world, providing us with a glossed over account of the time. Opting for a more personal and candid approach, MAESTRO shows the true history of the people through a realistic creative aesthetic. Tracing the underground’s dance origin, MAESTRO brings out a real understanding of this intense lifestyle, and the lives they lived and died for. It is far from mere nostalgia, this film is like the music and experiences it chronicles.

THNX to: Gaia Somasca
www.maestro-documentary.com

Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License.