Chicago

Jerome Derradji’s present “A Gram Of Boogie” The Story of Lee Moore

Hi Jerome Derradji! I’m very happy about your hard work reissuing old unknown/hard to find gems!

Thank you. My pleasure really!

1. First tell us about your love for futuristic boogie …

Well, yeah futuristic boogie is this music that just makes you dance. It combines so many elements taken from disco, soul, r’n’b and jazz with a heavy splash of electronic synths and drum machines. The perfect combination in my humble opinion and a great influencer of all things House. Magic stuff I believe.

2. How did you find Lee Moore?

That’s a really long story…. In short I first found Paul Zaleski, who is living in California, he was the engineer and VP at Score Records. From that we’ve tracked down Lee Moore and I ended up on the phone with Lee. We hit it off real fast and started working with Lee right away.

3. From blues, gospel, soul: B.B. King, Johnny Cash, Elvis Presley, Aretha Franklin, Jerry Lee Lewis, Al Green, Tina Turner, Booker T. & the M.G.’s, Otis Redding, Isaac Hayes … tell us about Memphis boogie funk.

Memphis is really a special city. A cradle for a lot of music and all things soulful. Boogie was a logical evolution of the soul and disco sounds of the time. Lee Moore just pushed it further by changing the way it was produced, engineered and recorded. Lee spent more time in the studio than promoting himself or his label Score Records. But at the time, in Memphis, he was very known for his music.

4. “A Gram Of Boogie”, theres more than a gram …

Indeed. That’s all thanks to Lee Moore.

5. Do You Feel Like A Party

It’s a tune that Lee wrote and released initially on LM Records out of New York. Lee wanted his music to sound more like a New York dance record than a Memphis record. By that he meant less stripped down and raw and more produced with a heavy basslines and kicks. I believe it’s one of his most known records for a good reason. It’s excellent.

6. Reachin Out For Your Love

Lee’s first 12” for Source Records – a major a the time. It was his attempt to break into the US charts. A killer disco track that defined Lee Moore’s sound. Although it reached the Bilboard charts, Source didn’t put enough efforts in promoting it and Lee moved on to launch Score Records.

7. Sometime theres differences between versions from 7 to 12 Mix. Tell us about as nowadays its impossible to find multiple version of a track on new releases.

Yeah, it’s very normal for music made in this era. Lee was surrounded by amazing musicians – most of them being seasoned Stax musicians. So you would always get a shorter 7” mix, a longer 12” mix, instrumental, dub etc… I still think a lot of dance labels operate this way with different mixes and remixes.

 

Subway Featuring Wave – Ten Toes Up 12" SOLD OUT

8. Whats In The Dark Will Come To Life

One of my personal favorites. It still sounds like the future of soul and funk. Magnificent stuff really. But honestly there’s so much great music with each of Lee’s releases.

Jerome Derradji – Still Music / Past Due Records / Stilove4music – Chicago
interview 10.2017 Family House.

www.itstillmusic.com
Discogs

A Gram Of Boogie
The story of Lee Moore – Score Records & LM Records
Memphis, 1979-89.
Cat # Pastdue5LPBox02
Format – Vinyl + Insert

HOUSE NATION CHICAGO Chris “The Incredible” interview

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1. Introduce yourself

My Name is Chris.  I am from the south side of Chicago.  I have been DJing and collecting Chicago House records since I was 15 years old (about 23 years).  I started @House_Nation_Chicago to share my record collection and educate new people about Chicago House, Italo, and Deep House Music.  I hope to use these records to tell the stories of the evolution of Chicago House Music.

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2. Where do you get your inspiration

I have another instagram page @kanamit_mpc where I service and sell drum machines.  I follow a lot of producers and sample cats.  I would always see guys post their records and it was always soul or jazz.  I didn’t see any page dedicated to House music, so I decided to make @house_Nation_chicago. As a DJ, I get my inspiration from old WBMX mixes by Farley Jackmaster Funk.  If I’m trying to produce something I study the greats like Marshall Jefferson, Mr Fingers, Farley, DJ Pierre, etc.

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3. Chicago House Music scene past/present

Chicago House Music was able to grow because of the clubs like the Warehouse, The Playground and The Music Box.  Those were special places where Frankie, Ron, Jesse and Farley could be play the music they wanted. They could experiment and try different styles of music. Once the city of Chicago changed the laws on juice bars they could no longer operate and that almost killed the scene here.  There are always house parties going on in the city.  Of course there are certain clubs that always play house, but I don’t think anyone can duplicate the feeling or sound of the Music Box.  A few times a year there will be a big Hot Mix 5 party or Farley’s B Day bash. The biggest event of the year is the Chosen Few Picnic.  It takes place in a park by the lake.  Theres no dress code and no age limit.  I think that is really where people can go and just be free with the music.  There’s young and old, black and white.  People just go there for the music and to have fun.

Un post condiviso da The Chosen Few™ DJs (@chosenfewdjs) in data:

4. I heard from Mike Huckaby (Deep Transportation – Detroit) that several Detroit djs moved to Chicago with their car almost every week to listen to Chicago’s legendary WBMX AM & FM. Talk about this radio and the incredible music shared on their radio shows.

In my opinion WBMX is the big part of the puzzle that really gets overlooked.  You see, Chicago was a very segregated city.  You have black neighborhoods, white neighborhoods, Mexican, Puerto Rican, etc.  People stayed in their own neighborhoods. Back in the 80s The Warehouse was a gay black bar. Most people were not going to party there. Wbmx is very important because it allowed the music to reach everyone in the city. WBMX Program director Lee Michaels had a city wide dj competition. Everyone submitted tapes, even Frankie Knuckles. Lee selected 6 DJs with different styles to represent the different parts of the city. The DJs he picked became known as the HOT Mix 5. (The 6th guy never showed so they ended up with 5) Instead of going to a club you could hear this music on Friday or Saturday night from you car or bedroom. This is what really helped get the music to everyone around the city.  The type of music they played, how they played it, and the skill that they had was never ever seen or heard before.

Ron Hardy Channel On WBMX.COM

5. Ron Hardy and Music Box, the key, the only godfather of house music

Everyone loves Frankie and there wouldn’t be a movement without him and the Warehouse, but it was Ron Hardy who made Chicago house as we know it today.  Anything that Marshall Jefferson made he took to Ron.  Ron was playing these tracks and no one ever heard of Virgo or Marshall Jefferson.  Dj Pierre gave Acid Tracks to Ron.  Ron played it 4 times.  The first 3 times no one danced.  The fourth time the crowd went crazy.  He was a pioneer.  I don’t think house would have evolved the way it did without him.

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6. Frankie Knuckles “Warehouse”

Chicago didnt have any club scene in the 70s.  Chicago was dead compared to New York.  It wasn’t until Robert Williams opened the Warehouse and invited Frankie to be the resident.  This was where it all started for Chicago.  Frankie was playing underground disco.  People started to talk about it and went to experience the music.  They didn’t care that it was a gay club.  The music became so popular guys would go into Imports Etc and ask for that house music.  Referring to music that was played at the warehouse.

7. Sadar Bahar currently the ambassador of Chicago Disco, Boogie

Sadar Bahar has stayed true to the original meaning of house.  That is the underground disco that was played at the warehouse. He is known for possessing some of the rarest records from that time. He created his own identity by doing the opposite of everyone else.  DJs would all play the same popular cuts and he did the opposite and started digging for rare obscure tracks.  He definitely is in a class of his own.

Sadar Bahar ∞ Domenica 30.07.2017 #partyhardy Disco Dancing Chalet Paola Perarock Festival

8. How Italo-Disco influenced Chicago House Music

I think Italo Disco had a major influence on the Chicago House sound.  The Hot Mix 5 was playing alot of Italo Disco and imports.  Jesse Saunders and Farley played imports at the Playground.  You can really hear the similarities in the drum patters in songs like Chi Chi Liah – Proud Mary or Alessandro Novaga – Electronic Drums.  That music heavily influenced early house production.

9. When European, Italian sound appear in US Chicago Record Stores

Those records started to show up around 81 – 83.  They were not available in every store.  There were only 2 places in Chicago where you can get imports.  One was the legendary Imports Etc and Loop records.  A good example is Hypnotic Tango.  I think they sold 30,000 copies of that record here.  They kept the pressing plant open just to supply the stores in Chicago.

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10. Your music experience drum machines, synthesizers, sequencers

I’m always working and learning.  As I said I buy and sell drum machines.  Mainly the mpc.  I currently work on the MPC 3000, Roland Tr8, Roland TB03, and a Korg Minilogue.  I have experiences with all of the MPCs but like using the 3000.  I don’t use any software for creating. I think all of the advances in technology have killed creativity.  Its not always true, but simple is better to me.  Listen to the music that was made with a 909 and a jupiter (Mr Fingers Can You Feel It). Everyone is doing too much now.  Faster workflow yes but not necessarily better music.

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11. Talk about the House Music documentary you create

I have not made any documentaries yet.  I have been very fortunate that I have made some relationships with guys like DJ Pierre and Jesse Saunders.  If i get the opportunity I would like to do a documentary focusing on how the music was made or how the relationships were formed.  These guys were kids and were taken advantage of.  theres a lot people don’t know about.  Im interested in the gear that was used and the ideas behind some of the songs. Many of those stories never get told because everyone documents the same thing over and over.

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12. Enlighten us on your dream project

My dream project is to release a Jack Trax EP on Afro Acid which is DJ Pierre’s Label.  Releasing an EP has always been a goal of mine but to do it with the Legendary DJ Pierre on his label would really be something special to me.

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www.instagram.com/house_nation_chicago/

CHRIS “THE INCREDIBLE” HOUSE NATION CHICAGO intw. 06.2017 Family House.

Sadar Bahar ∞ Domenica 30.07.2017 #partyhardy Disco Dancing Chalet Paola Perarock Festival

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SADAR BAHAR (Soul in the Hole – Chicago)

Sadar Bahar è molto più di un Dj. Sadar Bahar è un pezzo della storia di Chicago, dei suoi club e delle sue sonorità. È difficile etichettare il sound di questo artista, perché come lui stesso ha dichiarato:

“Mentre tutti i dj andavano da una parte, io ho scelto una direzione diversa”.

E questa strada lo ha portato a creare uno stile tutto suo, ribattezzato “Soul in the Hole”. Influenze: soul, funk, boogie, disco arricchite dal suo gusto e ricerca; lunghe ore passate nei negozi di dischi, mercatini per scovare suoni dimenticati, “nuovi”. Una caccia ossessiva, che lo ha portato a essere un vorace collezionista di vinili.


” YOU HAVE TO DO .. YOU! ” SADAR BAHAR CDR Berlin interview

“Massì, voglio semplicemente diventare uno dei più grandi collezionisti del mondo” …

Sadar Bahar te lo dice ridendo, perché in lui il buonumore è continuo e contagioso, ma in realtà sta affermando una cosa maledettamente vera. Il suo arsenale di vinili è praticamente sterminato. Chicagoano, cresciuto inevitabilmente col mito di Ron Hardy, ad un certo punto si è reso conto che i dj della sua città tendevano a comprare tutti gli stessi dischi negli stessi posti. Lì è partita quella che lui chiama “…una malattia lunga ormai più di trent’anni”: cercare di tutto, essere un cacciatore maniacale di vinili. La differenza? Li suona divinamente (Damir Ivic).

Bahar è stato definito da Theo Parrish “il DJ dei DJ”.

Musica calda, seducente, piena di melodie cosmic e vodoo funk, Vi aspettiamo al Perarock!

RA: http://ift.tt/1T6UlD7
FB: http://ift.tt/2sRo3E8

Discogs

RA event

Joe R. Lewis Target Records Chicago intw.

DJ-Joe-Lewis-Picture

1. Why and When did you start to produce music?

True story: back in elementary school, house music wasn’t my first love of music; in fact, it was rock and roll music. I use to get teased for listening to this style of music, not only from the guys, but from the girls too! While everyone was listening to either R&B or dance (disco) music, I was listening to rock and roll music. I use to play my rock and roll music on a very large boom box (everywhere I went) and were wearing my Kiss T-shirts too! One day, I eventually knew and heard my calling (to attract the girls) not only to DJ, but to also through some of the biggest “house music” parties that Chicago has ever known and loved.

At “The Loop Roller Disco Skating Rink”, I re-named it “The Loop Machine” where I was DJing and organizing pack to capacity house music dance parties by the thousands, every Friday and Saturday night, also booking other Chicago house music legendary DJ’s, such as, the godfather’s of house music “Frankie Knuckles and Ron Hardy ‘aka’ Ronnie”, the king of house music “Farley “Jackmaster” Funk”, Steve “Silk” Hurley, Mike Dunn, Armando Gallop ‘aka’ Armando, etc. I also hosted my very own bi-level house music dance club in Chicago named “The Jungle Club” and the rest was history.

2. Where do you continually get your inspiration?

I continue to and always will get my great inspirations from two of my greatest music influences: Larry Heard ‘aka’ Mr. Fingers and Byron Walton ‘aka’ Jamie Principal.

3. Talk about Target Records.

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In 1981, I was fed up with a few of the labels here in Chicago due to their mishandling practices of money that I decided to venture off on a label of my own. I confided my greatest intention to a great friend of mine, the grand high priest of Chicago’s house music “Craig S. Loftis” who regularly DJ’d here in Chicago alongside the godfather of house music “Frankie Knuckles” about my decision. Craig thought my intention was an intelligent one, and in fact, he named my label and “Target Records Chicago” was now born.

DJ Joe Lewis is the president, C.E.O., and founder of “Target Records Chicago” since 1981, which was ideal only for me, but I decided to help or gather up a few other inspiring DJ’s and artists along the way, such as, Larry Heard ‘aka’ Mr. Fingers, Paul (Leighton) Johnson, and Melvin Meeks, just to name a few. That was one of the smartest and intelligent idea I have ever made.

4. Love Of My Own and Change Reaction EP seminal House Music Productions.

In 1986, The Love of My Own was highly anticipated due to my meeting with Larry Heard ‘aka’ Mr. Fingers, whom I meet through the help of his younger brother (baby fingers) back in high school. While in school, baby fingers, told me that Larry was his older brother, I was a non-believer.
One day, after school, baby fingers invited me over to the family’s house (within walking distance from the school) with great excitement and much disbelief, I accepted. At the time, I didn’t know what Larry really looks like or if he would even be there at all, but I was determined to find out about him anyway. I was soon invited to walk into an off to the side bedroom (of which was Larry’s) and there was a guy, who I now know as Larry, creating this wonderful masterpiece “Mystery of Love” for the first time being recorded, ever! I was mesmerized by the sights and sounds of his incredible work of art.

I was so amazed that I also created my magical masterpiece “The Love of My Own” a style I believe symbolizes Larry’s with a dream that he would work with me on this project and, in fact, he did. Two years later, in 1988, I simply wanted to create a house collector’s E.P. album titled “Change Reaction” of which it was and still is today a highly collectable E.P. album. This is one of my most sought after E.P. album, if you are very blessed to own one. The prices for this incredible work is sky rocketing high everyday and soaring from 3 to 4 figure sums on EBay, happy hunting.

5. Talk about Repress, Bootleg, your new record on Clone.

I believe repressing of great quality house music, such as, club music that receives much more radio play is a good thing. Not only does it help the DJ that could buy a brand spanking new copy to replace the scratched, worn out one that he or she banged to death in the club. It can help with fond memories, re-living, or re-birthing of those great house music parties and moments. It also will help the new generation, who may not have heard of this great style of house music played before or may not have known of this quality work of art from various artists, to further educate them about the making and the history lesson of house music, and to keep the house music culture that we helped build alive, because the newer generation is our future DJ’s and recording artist’s.

Far as bootlegging, I’ve been bootlegged once or twice before, nowadays, who hasn’t. I win settlements in or out of court. Just remember this; if anyone chooses to bootleg me for any reason at all ever again, without express written consent from “Target Records Chicago”, we’re going to come after you (all around the world) in a court of law, no excuses, period! With my approval, I have three re-releases that are out or either scheduled to come out in the near future on two of the most well respected labels, such as, “CHIWAX and Clone records”. The CHIWAX re-release titled “Chi-House” is out not, so go and reserve your copies today and the Clone record releases titled “Lost In Tracks” and “Change Reaction” originally released on “Target Records Chicago” in 1988, will be re-released very soon. All three of these re-releases were hard to find, but now will be a must have again and will continue to be a crowd pleaser as usual. They are very highly sought after and anticipated and will sell out fast, so don’t sleep on these beautiful gems.

6. Tell us about Chicago music scene past/present.

The Chicago house music scene of the past is the “Holy Grail” and shouldn’t be compared to the Chicago house music scene of the present, which would be an insult! We shouldn’t even be comparing the two in the same sentence. That’s like trying to mix oil and water, those two will never mix. Just like this comparison, there is none! The past history of the Chicago house music scene was the originators, who helped pave the way for D.J.’s and artist’s, such as myself and countless others. They helped to create, form, and shaped this culture and dance music craves, that’s being felt all over the world today! The house heads here, we use to look forward to clubs in the past, such as, the warehouse (the original location), the music box, the candy store, C.O.D.’s, etc. We use to look forward to the greatest D.J.’s of all times, the godfather’s of Chicago’s house music and beyond “Frankie Knuckles and Ron Hardy ‘aka’ Ronnie” and the founding father of Chicago’s house music “Lil Louis”. No matter where these three D.J.’s / Artists played, ALL D.J.’s here (no matter how big or small their D.J. name was or is) came out to hear these three legends play every time, even me. We miss good, productive radio station dedicated to the game of house music such as, Saturday nite live, ain’t no jive, Chicago’s number one dance party, heard on 102.7 F.M. W.B.M.X. Oak Park / Chicago. We also remember there was a record shop that we all loved and supported throughout the many years of house (young or older people bought records here) “Imports, etc. records”.

The present history of Chicago house music scene is not being felt, loved, and respected in the same way that it once was. Although, the nightlife scene has been down and climbing up steadily, it seems to be going in the right direction now with the new breeds on hand: D.J.’s, Artist’s, dance venue’s, and even the record sales are on the rise too! We (Chicagoans) have to stick together much better to make this thing we love, call house music that we helped build, work again! We have to be the trendsetters from the past and carry it into the present (looked up to again) like we us to.

7. Drums, Synthesizers and Sequencer.

There are a lot of amazing drum machines, synthesizers, and sequencers out there, but there are quite too many to mention right now. As to the pacific gear I use, that’s for me to know and for everyone else to find out (very mysterious), one love and respect for the artist and the house music creation.

8. Which artists are you currently listening to?

While I have no favorites, I listen to every artist from around the globe that is very dedicated in making quality house music, especially those artists who use live instruments in their creations, such as I, and such as, club music.

9. Your best place for music .. around the world?!

Where I’m DJing (I’m back!), where the beat and the house music take me, to a well-advertised dance venue with thousands of patrons in an attendance, or a quality recording studio, anywhere around the world (I’m releasing new music).

10. Enlighten us on your dream project?

At the moment, I have no dream projects in sight (I’m releasing new music again!) I’m not a big dreamer, but I wouldn’t mind collaborating again with Larry Heard ‘aka’ Mr. Fingers or I wouldn’t mind doing a project with Byron Walton ‘aka’ Jamie Principal. I would be up for doing a project with DJ’s or artist’s, such as, Stacy Kidd, Glenn Underground, Sheree Hicks, Brain Pope ‘aka’ DJ Pope, Dmitri Bronson, and Elise Gargalikis, just to name a few.

Target Records Chicago – Facebook Page

Joe Lewis – Facebook Profile

Joe R. Lewis Target Records Chicago intw. 06.2016 Family House.

 

DJ T-1000 | Alan Oldham

1. What can you tell us about the early days of UR?

It was very exciting. I came into UR after it had already started with Jeff Mills, Mike Banks, and Rob Hood. I was helping out around the UR office doing press and PR. Then I was invited to go on tour with them after Jeff quit. I stayed for a year in UR before going out on my own.

Jeff and UR started my DJ and producing career off, and I’ll always be grateful.

2. I’ve read that you announced it is your last only vinyl tour. Is it true? And why did you take this decision?

I still like playing vinyl but a) promoters almost NEVER have good, solid DJ set-ups for decks and b) a lot of the music released now is more suited to digital release/playing than vinyl.

Also, few people appreciate a good, rockin’ DJ show any more, it seems.

I play digital and release records under the name Detroitrocketscience, so that will be the push for next year.

But if any promoters with solid turntable set-ups want an old-school DJ T-1000 vinyl show, that’s fine, too!

L-3063-1296547212 L-1238-1346527682-6998

3. What do you consider absolutly personal in your sound?

Heavy bass, big kicks, up-tempo, dancefloor friendly.

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“25 Years Alan Oldham Design.”

4. Who is your favourite comic illustrator and why?

I have several, but Howard Chaykin is my all-time favorite in story and art. He’s been working at a high level for decades now, and he’s personally a really cool dude as well.

06ht Alan Oldham by Marie Staggat(1)

www.alanoldham.com

Discogs

Facebook Page

Soundcloud

DJ T-1000 Alan Oldham interview by Eudosia Luxemburg Crispy.
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Facebook Event

MR. FINGERS / LARRY HEARD

17.02.2006r

[20.02.2006 20:05 | dax]

LARRY HEARD aka MR. FINGERS è stato fenomenale: davvero è raro ascoltare sound così al giorno d’oggi! Detroit, Deep, Disco miscelate sapientemente per creare una atmosfera unica +

Ha suonato quasi 3 ore e a giudizio di molti miei amici patiti di house music è stata la più bella serata da anni …
Larry ha dimostrato una sensibilità e fantasia incredibile, pensate che ha suonato togliendosi le scarpe, quindi scalzo, probabilmente per un discorso di sensibilità e vibrazioni!

Un ringraziamento particolare ad Enrico Volcov (www.neroli.it) e allo Staff del Fabbrika, SWENSON, ELIX, DEMIS.

TENETE BEN PRESENTE QUESTA COSA: Larry per ovvi motivi di età, non viaggia spesso per suonare, capita solo rare volte! La fortuna o il destino ci han permesso di bookarlo e di ascoltarlo, ballarlo profondamente!

A tutti i patiti di musica house/techno consiglio il suo album “AMNESIA” su Jack Trax e tutti gli altri lavori …
grazie ancora Larry! alla prossima, ciao dax*

[22.01.2006 12:48 | dax]

Venerdì 17 febbraio AMNESIA MR FINGERS/LARRY HEARD + DAX DJ and Fabbrika Crew

per chi non sapesse… (leggete è cultura!)

larryheard

Proprio a Chicago, nel 1982 tale Larry Heard, padre della musica House mondiale, compose la traccia che per me e molti cultori, rimane la `sola´ a cui ci si può riferire quando si parla di questo tipo di musica,Mr. Fingers “Can You Feel It”. Questa traccia strumentale venne stampata solo nel 1986 su Chicago Traxx Records mentre nel 1987 venne arricchita di un testo letto con passione da Chuck Robb. Le parole di questo testo descrivono a tutt´oggi cosa è l´House Music.
Infatti cito testualmente: “House is a Feeling …”. Questo è il segreto della musica House. Solo un `sentimento´ che proviene dal cuore – cioè qualcosa che tutti noi proviamo – poteva colpire, allo stesso tempo e nello stesso istante, masse di persone, con così tante differenze culturali ed etniche, per unirle nel nome della purezza che la musica House esprime.

Those are some of the words spoken when describing the almost indescribable music of Larry Heard (AKA Mr. Fingers).
His musical influence can be heard in the songs of countless artists. For those who appreciate warm and passionate digital compositions, Larry’s music is pure magic. Larry has been blessed with a unique gift that sends listeners into a blissful euphoric state. One of his first releases in 1986 was a collaboration with singer Robert Owens, released under the group name “Fingers Inc.”. The song “Mystery of Love” instantly became a classic hit, rising to #10 on the Billboard Dance charts.
1988 saw the release of the beautiful & groundbreaking double album entitled “Another Side”, showcasing the unstoppable talents of Larry, Robert, and vocalist Ron Wilson.
Since then, he has released several dance/r&b/ambient albums that have kept fans satisfied while gaining waves of new listeners. Recent releases like “Loosefingers” are a stunning testament to his artistic integrity. Never one to sacrifice expression for economic awards, Larry continues to retain his unique and inviting sound. www.deephousepage.com; www.discogs.com/artist/Larry+Heard

FABBRIKA – via dell’Industria, 10 – Torri di Quartesolo (VI)